PostHeaderIcon Break Chip ATMEGA861P Code

We can Break chip ATMEGA861P code, please view the chip ATMEGA861P features for your reference:
Timer 2 is selected as the baud rate generator by setting TCLK and/or RCLK in T2CON (Table 2). Note that the baud rates for transmit and receive can be different if Timer 2 is used for the receiver or transmitter and Timer 1 is used for the other function. Setting RCLK and/or TCLK puts Timer 2 into its baud rate generator mode, as shown in Figure 4 when Break Chip ATMEGA861P Code.
The baud rate generator mode is similar to the auto-reload mode, in that a rollover in TH2 causes the Timer 2 registers to be reloaded with the 16 bit value in registers RCAP2H and RCAP2L, which are preset by code.
The baud rates in Modes 1 and 3 are determined by Timer 2’s overflow rate according to the following equation. The Timer can be configured for either timer or counter operation. In most applications, it is configured for timer operation (CP/T2 = 0) before Break Chip ATMEGA861P Code.
The timer operation is different for Timer 2 when it is used as a baud rate generator. Normally, as a timer, it increments every machine cycle (at 1/12 the oscillator frequency). As a baud rate generator, however, it increments every state time (at 1/2 the oscillator fre-quency).
The baud rate formula is given below. where (RCAP2H, RCAP2L) is the content of RCAP2H and RCAP2L taken as a 16 bit unsigned integer. Timer 2 as a baud rate generator is shown in Figure 4 when Break chip code.
This figure is valid only if RCLK or TCLK = 1 in T2CON. Note that a rollover in TH2 does not set TF2 and will not generate an interrupt. Note too, that if EXEN2 is set, a 1-to-0 transition in T2EX will set EXF2 but will not cause a reload from (RCAP2H, RCAP2L) to (TH2, TL2) if Break Chip ATMEGA861P Code.
Thus when Timer 2 is in use as a baud rate generator, T2EX can be used as an extra external interrupt. Note that when Timer 2 is running (TR2 = 1) as a timer in the baud rate generator mode, TH2 or TL2 should not be read from or written to.
Under these conditions, the Timer is incremented every state time, and the results of a read or write may not be accurate. The RCAP2 registers may be read but should not be written to, because a write might overlap a reload and cause write and/or reload errors. The timer should be turned off (clear TR2) before accessing the Timer 2 or RCAP2 registers after Break IC.

PostHeaderIcon Break MCU ATMEGA861V Flash

We can break MCU ATMEGA861V flash, please view the MCU ATMEGA861V features for your reference:

A 50% duty cycle clock can be programmed to come out on P1.0, as shown in Figure 5. This pin, besides being a regular I/0 pin, has two alternate functions. It can be programmed to input the external clock for Timer/Counter 2 or to output a 50% duty cycle clock ranging from 61 Hz to 4 MHz at a 16 MHz operating frequency when break MCU flash.
To configure the Timer/Counter 2 as a clock generator, bit C/T2 (T2CON.1) must be cleared and bit T2OE (T2MOD.1) must be set. Bit TR2 (T2CON.2) starts and stops the timer if break MCU flash.
The clock-out frequency depends on the oscillator frequency and the reload value of Timer 2 capture registers (RCAP2H, RCAP2L), as shown in the following equation before break MCU flash.
In the clock-out mode, Timer 2 rollovers will not generate an interrupt. This behavior is similar to when Timer 2 is used as a baud-rate generator. It is possible to use Timer 2 as a baud-rate generator and a clock generator simultaneously after break MCU flash.
Note, however, that the baud-rate and clock-out frequencies cannot be determined independently from one another since they both use RCAP2H and RCAP2L when break MCU flash.
The UART in the AT89S53 operates the same way as the UART in the ATMEGA861V. For fur- ther information, see the October 1995 MMCUrocontroller Data Book, page 2-49, section titled, “Serial Interface.” if break MCU flash
The serial peripheral interface (SPI) allows high-speed synchronous data transfer between the ATMEGA861V and peripheral devMCUes or between several ATMEGA861V devMCUes before break MCU flash.
The AT89S53 SPI features include the following:
Full-Duplex, 3-Wire Synchronous Data Transfer
Master or Slave Operation
1.5-MHz Bit Frequency (max.)
LSB First or MSB First Data Transfer
Four Programmable Bit Rates after break MCU flash
End of Transmission Interrupt Flag
Write Collision Flag Protection
Wakeup from Idle Mode (Slave Mode Only)

PostHeaderIcon Recover Microprocessor ATMEGA640V Firmware

We can recover microprocessor ATMEGA640V firmware, please view the microprocessor ATMEGA640V features for your reference:
XTAL1 and XTAL2 are the input and output, respectively, of an inverting amplifier that can be configured for use as an on-chip oscillator, as shown in Figure 11. Either a quartz crystal or ceramic resonator may be used.
To drive the device from an external clock source, XTAL2 should be left unconnected while XTAL1 is driven, as shown in Figure 12.
There are no requirements on the duty cycle of the external clock signal, since the input to the internal clocking circuitry is through a divide-by-two flip-flop, but minimum and maximum voltage high and low time specifications must be observed if Recover Microprocessor ATMEGA640V Firmware.
In idle mode, the CPU puts itself to sleep while all the on-chip peripherals remain active. The mode is invoked by software. The content of the on-chip RAM and all the special functions registers remain unchanged during this mode. The idle mode can be terminated by any enabled interrupt or by a hardware reset.
Note that when idle mode is terminated by a hardware reset, the device normally resumes firmware execution from where it left off, up to two machine cycles before the internal reset algorithm takes control. On-chip hardware inhibits access to internal RAM in this event, but access to the port pins is not inhibited.
To eliminate the possibility of an unexpected write to a port pin when idle mode is terminated by a reset, the instruction following the one that invokes idle mode should not write to a port pin or to external memory when Recover Microprocessor ATMEGA640V Firmware.
In the power down mode, the oscillator is stopped and the instruction that invokes power down is the last instruction executed. The on-chip RAM and Special Function Registers retain their values until the power down mode is terminated.
Exit from power down can be initiated either by a hardware reset or by an enabled external interrupt. Reset redefines the SFRs but does not change the on-chip RAM. The reset should not be activated before VCC is restored to its normal operating level and must be held active long enough to allow the oscillator to restart and stabilize before Recover Microprocessor ATMEGA640V Firmware.
To exit power down via an interrupt, the external interrupt must be enabled as level sensitive before entering power down. The interrupt service routine starts at 16 ms (nominal) after the enabled interrupt pin is activated after RECOVER MCU.

PostHeaderIcon Reverse Engineering Microcontroller ATMEGA644PA Firmware

We can reverse engineering microcontroller ATMEGA644PA firmware, please view the microcontroller ATMEGA644PA features for your reference:
Note that if a level triggered interrupt is used for wake-up from Power-down mode, the changed level must be held for some time to wake up the MCU. Refer to “External Interrupts” on page 75 for details.
When waking up from Power-down mode, there is a delay from the wake-up condition occurs until the wake-up becomes effective. This allows the clock to restart and become stable after having been stopped. The wake-up period is defined by the same CKSEL Fuses that define the Reset Time-out period, as described in “Clock Sources” on page 40. When the SM2..0 bits are written to 011, the SLEEP instruction makes the MCU enter Power-save mode before reverse engineering microcontroller ATMEGA644PA firmware.
This mode is identical to Power-down, with one exception: If Timer/Counter2 is enabled, it will keep running during sleep. The device can wake up from either Timer Overflow or Output Compare event from Timer/Counter2 if the corresponding Timer/Counter2 interrupt enable bits are set in TIMSK2, and the Global Interrupt Enable bit in SREG is set.
If Timer/Counter2 is not running, Power-down mode is recommended instead of Power-save mode. The Timer/Counter2 can be clocked both synchronously and asynchronously in Power-save mode. If the Timer/Counter2 is not using the asynchronous clock, the Timer/Counter Oscillator is stopped during sleep when REVERSE ENGINEERING MICROCONTROLLER.
If the Timer/Counter2 is not using the synchronous clock, the clock source is stopped during sleep. Note that even if the synchronous clock is running in Power-save, this clock is only available for the Timer/Counter2. When the SM2..0 bits are 110 and an external crystal/resonator clock option is selected, the SLEEP instruction makes the MCU enter Standby mode. This mode is identical to Power-down with the exception that the Oscillator is kept running. From Standby mode, the device wakes up in six clock cycles before reverse engineering microcontroller ATMEGA644PA firmware.

PostHeaderIcon Recover MCU ATMEGA162A Heximal

We can recover MCU ATMEGA162A Heximal, please view the MCU ATMEGA162A features for your reference:
When the SM2..0 bits are 111 and an external crystal/resonator clock option is selected, the SLEEP instruction makes the MCU enter Extended Standby mode. This mode is identical to Power-save mode with the exception that the Oscillator is kept running.
From Extended Standby mode, the device wakes up in six clock cycles. The Power Reduction Register, PRR, provides a method to stop the clock to individual peripherals to reduce power consumption. The current state of the peripheral is frozen and the I/O registers can not be read or written if recover MCU heximal.
Resources used by the peripheral when stopping the clock will remain occupied, hence the peripheral should in most cases be disabled before stopping the clock. Waking up a module, which is done by clearing the bit in PRR, puts the module in the same state as before shutdown.
Module shutdown can be used in Idle mode and Active mode to significantly reduce the overall power consumption. See “Supply Current of IO modules” on page 381 for examples. In all other sleep modes, the clock is already stopped.
Bit 7 – PRTWI: Power Reduction TWI
Writing a logic one to this bit shuts down the TWI by stopping the clock to the module. When waking up the TWI again, the TWI should be re initialized to ensure proper operation when recover MCU heximal.
Bit 6 – PRTIM2: Power Reduction Timer/Counter2
Writing a logic one to this bit shuts down the Timer/Counter2 module in synchronous mode (AS2 is 0). When the Timer/Counter2 is enabled, operation will continue like before the shutdown.
Bit 5 – PRTIM0: Power Reduction Timer/Counter0
Writing a logic one to this bit shuts down the Timer/Counter0 module. When the Timer/Counter0 is enabled, operation will continue like before the shutdown before RECOVER MCU.
Bit 4 – Res: Reserved bit
This bit is reserved bit and will always read as zero.
Bit 3 – PRTIM1: Power Reduction Timer/Counter1
Writing a logic one to this bit shuts down the Timer/Counter1 module. When the Timer/Counter1 is enabled, operation will continue like before the shutdown.
Bit 2 – PRSPI: Power Reduction Serial Peripheral Interface
Writing a logic one to this bit shuts down the Serial Peripheral Interface by stopping the clock to the module. When waking up the SPI again, the SPI should be re initialized to ensure proper operation after recover MCU heximal.
Bit 1 – PRUSART0: Power Reduction USART0
Writing a logic one to this bit shuts down the USART0 by stopping the clock to the module. When waking up the USART0 again, the USART0 should be re initialized to ensure proper operation when recover MCU heximal.

PostHeaderIcon Break MCU ATXMEGA64A1 Heximal

We can Break MCU ATXMEGA64A1 Heximal, please view the MCU ATXMEGA64A1 features for your reference:
The AVR architecture has two main memory spaces, the Program Memory and the Data Memory. In addition, the XMEGA A1 features an EEPROM Memory for non-volatile data storage. All three memory spaces are linear and require no paging. The available memory size configurations are shown in “Ordering Information” on page 2. In addition each device has a Flash memory signature row for calibration data, device identification, serial number etc. Non-volatile memory spaces can be locked for further write or read/write operations. This prevents unrestricted access to the application software.
When the device is powered on, the CPU starts to execute instructions from the lowest address in the Flash Program Memory ‘0’. The Program Counter (PC) addresses the next instruction to be fetched. After a reset, the PC is set to location ‘0’ from mcu program breaking.
Program flow is provided by conditional and unconditional jump and call instructions, capable of addressing the whole address space directly. Most AVR instructions use a 16-bit word format, while a limited number uses a 32-bit format.
During interrupts and subroutine calls, the return address PC is stored on the Stack. The Stack is effectively allocated in the general data SRAM, and consequently the Stack size is only limited by the total SRAM size and the usage of the SRAM. After reset the Stack Pointer (SP) points to the highest address in the internal SRAM. The SP is read/write accessible in the I/O memory space, enabling easy implementation of multiple stacks or stack areas. The data SRAM can easily be accessed through the five different addressing modes supported in the AVR CPU after the mcu program has been breaked.
• Flash Program Memory
– One linear address space
– In-System Programmable
– Self-Programming and Bootloader support
– Application Section for application code
– Application Table Section for application code or data storage
– Boot Section for application code or bootloader code
– Separate lock bits and protection for all sections
• Data Memory
– One linear address space
– Single cycle access from CPU
– SRAM
– EEPROM
Byte or page accessible
Optional memory mapping for direct load and store
– I/O Memory
Configuration and Status registers for all peripherals and modules
16-bit accessible General Purpose Register for global variables or flags
– External Memory support
– Bus arbitration
Safe and deterministic handling of CPU and DMA Controller priority
– Separate buses for SRAM, EEPROM, I/O Memory and External Memory access
Simultaneous bus access for CPU and DMA Controller
• Calibration Row Memory for factory programmed data
Oscillator calibration bytes
Serial number
Device ID for each device type
• User Signature Row
One flash page in size
Can be read and written from software
Data is kept after BREAK IC

PostHeaderIcon Break IC ATTINY261 Code

Break IC ATTINY261 Code

Break IC ATTINY261 Code

We can Break IC ATTINY261 Code, please view the IC ATTINY261 features for your reference:

High Performance, Low Power AVR® 8-Bit Microcontroller

Advanced RISC Architecture

– 123 Powerful Instructions – Most Single Clock Cycle Execution

– 32 x 8 General Purpose Working Registers

– Fully Static Operation when Break IC

 

Non-volatile Program and Data Memories

– 2/4/8K Byte of In-System Programmable Program Memory Flash

 

(ATtiny261/461/861)

Endurance: 10,000 Write/Erase Cycles

– 128/256/512 Bytes In-System Programmable EEPROM (ATtiny261)

Endurance: 100,000 Write/Erase Cycles

– 128/256/512 Bytes Internal SRAM (ATtiny261/461/861)

– Programming Lock for Self-Programming Flash Program and EEPROM Data Security

Peripheral Features

– 8/16-bit Timer/Counter with Prescaler and Two PWM Channels

– 8/10-bit High Speed Timer/Counter with Separate Prescaler after Break IC

3 High Frequency PWM Outputs with Separate Output Compare Registers

Programmable Dead Time Generator

– Universal Serial Interface with Start Condition Detector

– 10-bit ADC

11 Single Ended Channels

16 Differential ADC Channel Pairs

15 Differential ADC Channel Pairs with Programmable Gain (1x, 8x, 20x, 32x)

– Programmable Watchdog Timer with Separate On-chip Oscillator if Break IC

– On-chip Analog Comparator

Special Microcontroller Features

– debugWIRE On-chip Debug System

– In-System Programmable via SPI Port

– External and Internal Interrupt Sources

– Low Power Idle, ADC Noise Reduction, and Power-down Modes

– Enhanced Power-on Reset Circuit

– Programmable Brown-out Detection Circuit

– Internal Calibrated Oscillator

I/O and Packages

– 16 Programmable I/O Lines after Break IC

– 20-pin PDIP, 20-pin SOIC and 32-pad MLF

Operating Voltage:

– 1.8 – 5.5V for ATtiny261

– 2.7 – 5.5V for ATtiny261

Speed Grade:

– ATtiny261V/461V/861V: 0 – 4 MHz @ 1.8 – 5.5V, 0 – 10 MHz @ 2.7 – 5.5V when Break IC

– ATtiny261/461/861: 0 – 10 MHz @ 2.7 – 5.5V, 0 – 20 MHz @ 4.5 – 5.5V

– Active Mode: 1 MHz, 1.8V: 380ìA

– Power-down Mode: 0.1ìA at 1.8V

Typical values contained in this data sheet are based on simulations and characterization of other AVR microcontrollers manufactured on the same process technology. Min and Max values will be available after the device is characterized before Break IC.

The ATtiny261/461/861 is a low-power CMOS 8-bit microcontroller based on the AVR enhanced RISC architecture. By executing powerful instructions in a single clock cycle, the ATtiny261/461/861 achieves throughputs approaching 1 MIPS per MHz allowing the system designer to optimize power consumption versus processing speed.

PostHeaderIcon Recover MCU ATTINY25 Flash

We can Recover Mcu ATTINY25 Flash, please view the Mcu ATTINY25 features for your reference:

The ATtiny25/45/85 is a low-power CMOS 8-bit mcu based on the AVR enhanced RISC architecture. By executing powerful instructions in a single clock cycle, the ATtiny25/45/85 achieves throughputs approaching 1 MIPS per MHz allowing the system designer to optimize power consumption versus processing speed when Recover MCU ATTINY25 Flash.

The AVR core combines a rich instruction set with 32 general purpose working registers. All the 32 registers are directly connected to the Arithmetic Logic Unit (ALU), allowing two independent registers to be accessed in one single instruction executed in one clock cycle if Recover MCU ATTINY25 Flash.

The resulting architecture is more code efficient while achieving throughputs up to ten times faster than conventional CISC mcus.

The ATtiny25/45/85 provides the following features: 2/4/8K byte of In-System Programmable Flash, 128/256/512 bytes EEPROM, 128/256/256 bytes SRAM, 6 general purpose I/O lines, 32 general purpose working registers, one 8-bit Timer/Counter with compare modes, one 8-bit high speed Timer/Counter, Universal Serial Interface, Internal and External Interrupts, a 4-channel, 10-bit ADC, a programmable Watchdog Timer with internal Oscillator, and three software selectable power saving modes when Recover Mcu.

The Idle mode stops the CPU while allowing the SRAM, Timer/Counter, ADC, Analog Comparator, and Interrupt system to continue functioning. The Power-down mode saves the register contents, disabling all chip functions until the next Interrupt or Hardware Reset before Recover Mcu.

The ADC Noise Reduction mode stops the CPU and all I/O modules except ADC, to minimize switching noise during ADC conversions. The device is manufactured using Atmel’s high density non-volatile memory technology. The On-chip ISP Flash allows the Program memory to be re-programmed In-System through an SPI serial interface, by a conventional non-volatile memory programmer or by an On-chip boot code running on the AVR core before Recover Mcu.

The ATtiny25/45/85 AVR is supported with a full suite of program and system development tools including: C Compilers, Macro Assemblers, Program Debugger/Simulators, In-Circuit Emulators, and Evaluation kits after RECOVER MCU.

PostHeaderIcon Recover Microcontroller Attiny44 Code

We can Recover MCU ATTINY44 Code, please view the MICROCONTROLLER ATTINY44 features for your reference:

EEPROM read from application code does not work in Lock Bit Mode 3

Reading EEPROM when system clock frequency is below 900 kHz may not work, EEPROM read from application code does not work in Lock Bit Mode 3 When the Memory Lock Bits LB2 and LB1 are programmed to mode 3, EEPROM read does not work from the application code. Problem Fix/Work around Do not set Lock Bit Protection Mode 3 when the application code needs to read from EEPROM if Recover Microcontroller Attiny44 Code.

Reading EEPROM when system clock frequency is below 900 kHz may not work Reading data from the EEPROM at system clock frequency below 900 kHz may result in wrong data read. Problem Fix/Work around Avoid using the EEPROM at clock frequency below 900 kHz before Recover Microcontroller Attiny44 Code. Reading EEPROM when system clock frequency is below 900 kHz may not work

Reading EEPROM when system clock frequency is below 900 kHz may not work Reading data from the EEPROM at system clock frequency below 900 kHz may result in wrong data read.

Problem Fix/Work around Avoid using the EEPROM at clock frequency below 900 kHz.

Port A is a 8-bit bi-directional I/O port with internal pull-up resistors (selected for each bit). The Port A output buffers have symmetrical drive characteristics with both high sink and source capability before Recover MICROCONTROLLER. As inputs, Port A pins that are externally pulled low will source current if the pull-up resistors are activated. The Port A pins are tri-stated when a reset condition becomes active, even if the clock is not running when Recover Microcontroller Attiny44 Code.

Port A has an alternate functions as analog inputs for the ADC, analog comparator, timer/counter, SPI and pin change interrupt as described in ”Alternate Port Functions”. Port B is a 4-bit bi-directional I/O port with internal pull-up resistors (selected for each bit). The Port B output buffers have symmetrical drive characteristics with both high sink and source capability except PB3 which has the RESET capability.

To use pin PB3 as an I/O pin, instead of RESET pin, program (‘0’) RSTDISBL fuse before Recover MCU. As inputs, Port B pins that are externally pulled low will source current if the pull-up resistors are activated. The Port B pins are tri-stated when a reset condition becomes active, even if the clock is not running. Port B also serves the functions of various special features of the ATtiny24/44/84 as listed on Section 12.3 ”Alternate Port Functions” on page 61.

PostHeaderIcon Recover IC ATMEGA168PA Program

We can Recover IC ATMEGA168PA Program, please view the IC ATMEGA168PA features for your reference:

The lowest addresses in the program memory space are by default defined as the Reset and Interrupt Vectors. The complete list of vectors is shown in ”Interrupts” on page 56. The list also determines the priority levels of the different interrupts. The lower the address the higher is the priority level. RESET has the highest priority, and next is INT0 – the External Interrupt Request; The Interrupt Vectors can be moved to the start of the Boot Flash section by setting the IVSEL bit in the MCU Control Register (MCUCR). Refer to ”Interrupts” on page 56 for more information. The Reset Vector can also be moved to the start of the Boot Flash section by programming the BOOTRST Fuse, see ”Boot Loader Support – Read-While-Write Self-Programming, ATmega88 and ATmega168” on page 269 if Recover IC.

When an interrupt occurs, the Global Interrupt Enable I-bit is cleared and all interrupts are disabled. The user software can write logic one to the I-bit to enable nested interrupts. All enabled interrupts can then interrupt the current interrupt routine. The I-bit is automatically set when a Return from Interrupt instruction – RETI – is executed. There are basically two types of interrupts. The first type is triggered by an event that sets the Interrupt Flag. For these interrupts, the Program Counter is vectored to the actual Interrupt Vector in order to execute the interrupt handling routine, and hardware clears the corresponding Interrupt Flag after Recover IC.

Interrupt Flags can also be cleared by writing a logic one to the flag bit position(s) to be cleared. If an interrupt condition occurs while the corresponding interrupt enable bit is cleared, the Interrupt Flag will be set and remembered until the interrupt is enabled, or the flag is cleared by software. Similarly, if one or more interrupt conditions occur while the Global Interrupt Enable bit is cleared, the corresponding Interrupt Flag(s) will be set and remembered until the Global Interrupt Enable bit is set, and will then be executed by order of priority if Recover IC.

The second type of interrupts will trigger as long as the interrupt condition is present. These interrupts do not necessarily have Interrupt Flags. If the interrupt condition disappears before the interrupt is enabled, the interrupt will not be triggered. When the AVR exits from an interrupt, it will always return to the main program and execute one more instruction before any pending interrupt is served. Note that the Status Register is not automatically stored when entering an interrupt routine, nor restored when returning from an interrupt routine. This must be handled by software. When using the CLI instruction to disable interrupts, the interrupts will be immediately disabled after Recover MCU. No interrupt will be executed after the CLI instruction, even if it occurs simultaneously with the CLI instruction. The following example shows how this can be used to avoid interrupts during the timed EEPROM write sequence.